Recent Fire Damage Posts

Celebrate Summer Safety

3/8/2021 (Permalink)

Campfire with friends gathered around Campfire with friends gathered around

Summer is a time to enjoy the great outdoors, but it is also important to keep safety in mind. Consider the following tips, provided by the National Fire Protection Association, to keep you and your family safe all summer long.

-When using a charcoal grill, only use starter fluids designed for barbecue grills: do not add fluid after coals have been lit. When using a gas grill, ensure the hose connection is tight; check hoses for leaks. Applying soapy water to the hose will easily and safely reveal any leaks. When camping always use a flame-retardant tent and set up camp far away from the campfire.

-Always build campfire downwind from the tent area. Clear vegetation and dig a pit before building your fire. Extinguish the fire before going to sleep or leaving the campsite.

-Store liquid fire starter (not gasoline) away from your tent and campfire and only use dry kindling freshen a campfire.

Heating Safety Tips

3/3/2021 (Permalink)

Keep anything flammable at least three feet away from heating equipment, like the furnace, fireplace, wood stove or a portable space heater. Have a three foot “kid-free zone” around open fires and space heaters.

Make sure the fireplace has a sturdy screen to stop sparks from flying into the room. Ashes should be cold before putting them in a metal container. Keep the container a safe distance away from your home.

Remember to turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed.

It is recommended by the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) that you test both residential and commercial smoke alarms monthly.

Always use the right kind of fuel, specified by the manufacturer, for fuel burning space heaters.

Have heating equipment and chimneys cleaned and inspected every year by a qualified professional. This can mitigate any potential risk of damages due to heating of your home.

Most importantly remember that SERVPRO of Blount County, is your go-to fire restoration professional in the Maryville/Alcoa area! Give us a call today (865)982-2332

The Importance of Cleaning Your Dryer Vents

2/11/2021 (Permalink)

Wiping off a Lint Guard Screen It is important to clean and wipe off your dryer vents to mitigate the risk for any dryer related fires

According to FEMA, failure to clean home dryers causes 34% of home dryer fires. Home dryer fires cause $35 million in property loss and can even cause injury or death. To reduce the risk of these fires happening in your home, SERVPRO® of Blount County can help clean dryer vents and ducts that may have lint buildup. Other tips for keeping your dryer vents clean from the National Fire Protection Agency NFPA include cleaning the lint filter before and after each load and making sure the outdoor vent flap will open and is not restricted by snow, a bird’s nest, or other potential obstacles.
Our certified professionals can come out for a free estimate. For more information on cleaning dryer vents, contact SERVPRO® of Blount County at 865-982-2332

Winter Heating Hazard

12/9/2020 (Permalink)

Roof fire damage in Louisville After effect of a attic fire in Louisville

Winter Heating Hazards

Winter is here and it always bring a change in the weather! The days are shorter, the nights are longer and the temperatures are lower.  To help keep our homes and offices warm and cozy, people often turn to other sources of heat like fireplaces, wood burning stoves and portable space heaters.  Unfortunately, these alternative heating sources are the second leading cause of residential fires.  According to the National Fire Protection Association, those fires account for $893 million plus dollars in damages annually.  Here are several ways to help reduce the risk of a fire in your home or office.

  • Remember to turn all heaters off when leaving the room for good or going to bed.
  • For fuel burning space heaters, always use the proper type of fuel specified by the manufacturer.
  • Keep anything flammable at least three feet from heat sources including furnaces, fireplaces, wood stoves or portable space heaters.
  • Maintain a kid-free zone around open fires and space heaters.
  • Have chimneys cleaned and inspected yearly by a qualified or certified professional.
  • Make sure fireplaces have a sturdy screen to stop sparks from getting into the room or on the flooring. Always allow ashes to cool before putting them in a metal container. Keep the container a safe distance from your home or any out buildings.
  • Test all smoke alarms monthly.
  • Always hire a qualified professional when installing furnaces, water heaters, central heating and air equipment or gas appliances.

Winter Weather Means An Increase In House Fires

11/27/2020 (Permalink)

Every holiday season we unfortunately see an increase in the amount of fires in Maryville, TN. With the holiday season comes cold weather and often the need to add some extra heat. But when you add seasonal décor and extra heat sources, there are added risks involved.

According to FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Association and NFPA, the National Fire Prevention Association, half of all home fires caused by heating sources occur in the months of December, January, and February. Additionally, 1 in 6 home fires are a result of heating equipment, and 1 in 5 home fire deaths.

Extra precaution should be used to prevent fire damage and recognize the added risks.

  • Place all items including Christmas trees, candles, and other holiday decorations at least three feet away from heat sources like fireplaces, portable heaters, radiators, heat vents, and candles
  • Never use portable generators inside a residence or business. The output of carbon monoxide and fumes can be a silent killer.
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector and inspect it at least once a month.
  • Have a professional inspect your chimney annually to make sure it's operating correctly and cleaned as needed.
  • Never overload outlets with electrical heating sources. Make sure cord are not frayed or worn. No more than one source should be plugged in to one outlet.
  • Keep fire extinguishers serviced and up to date. Always keep one in the kitchen, close to the stove.
  • Always discard used and cooled ashes properly, a minimum of 10 feet away from houses or any building, using a metal container.

To learn more about SERVPRO of Blount County and our fire damage services click here. For more tips on preventing winter fires and education visit www.usfa.fema.gov/winter and www.nfpa.org/winter

Fire prevention Month

9/1/2020 (Permalink)

Rooftop in flames Flames coming out of a residential roof during a fire

October is Fire Prevention Month a perfect time to examine emergency preparedness plans for your home and business, including your fire escape plan. Do you have a fire escape plan? Have you changed your smoke alarm batteries within the last year?

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) designates a week each October to focus on fire prevention awareness. The 2019 theme is “Not Every Hero Wears a Cape. Plan and Practice Your Escape” which works to educate everyone about the small but important actions they can take to keep themselves and those around them safe with the planning and practicing of a fire escape plan. In a typical home fire, you may have as little as one to two minutes to escape safely from the time the smoke alarm sounds. Escape planning and practice can help you make the most of the time you have, giving everyone enough time to get out.

Be Prepared: Fire Prevention & Safety

3/9/2020 (Permalink)

Be Prepared: Fires

(3/21/20)

Being prepared in an emergency situation is key for both your safety and those around you, but did you know being prepared for any emergency starts well before the actual emergency?

Smoke alarms save lives when properly installed and maintained, according to the National Fire Protection Association  (NFPA). Nearly 60% of home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms (40%) or no smoke alarms that were working (18%).

In homes, smoke alarms should be located in every bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level, including the basement and upstairs areas. Extra smoke alarms may be recommended or even required in larger homes.

Test smoke alarms monthly by using the test button to ensure that each alarm is functioning properly. Smoke alarms with non-replaceable batteries need the entire alarm unit replaced every 8-10 years. Other alarms that have replaceable batteries should have the batteries replaced every year, while the group units should be replaced every 10 years.

If you need help installing, testing or changing batteries in your smoke alarms, contact your local fire department, an electrician, or the American Red Cross.

Be sure your home has a fire emergency plan in-place and it is recommended that you conduct regular fire drills with your family to ensure that everyone is informed on the procedures and steps.

For more information on emergency preparedness, contact your local SERVPRO of Blount County professionals at 865-982-2332.

Winter Heating Safety Tips

3/9/2020 (Permalink)

Winter Heating Safety Tips

When winter weather blows in cold temperatures, use the following safety tips when it comes to heating your home:

  • Always use the proper fuel, specified by the manufacturer, for fuel burning space heaters
  • Remember to turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed
  • Have heating equipment (HVAC) and chimneys cleaned and inspected every year by a qualified professional
  • Test smoke alarms monthly
  • Keep anything flammable at least three feet from heating sources like a furnace, fireplace, wood stove or portable space heater
  • Make sure all fireplaces have a sturdy screen to prevent sparks from flying into the room

If your home or office does suffer from smoke, soot or fire damage, contact your local SERVPRO® of Blount County Professionals to get your home or business back in order, quickly.

Winter Heating Hazards

12/20/2019 (Permalink)

Fire Damage in Louisville Fire Damage in Louisville

Winter Heating Hazards

Winter is here and it always bring a change in the weather! The days are shorter, the nights are longer and the temperatures are lower.  To help keep our homes and offices warm and cozy, people often turn to other sources of heat like fireplaces, wood burning stoves and portable space heaters.  Unfortunately, these alternative heating sources are the second leading cause of residential fires.  According to the National Fire Protection Association, those fires account for $893 million plus dollars in damages annually.  Here are several ways to help reduce the risk of a fire in your home or office.

  • Remember to turn all heaters off when leaving the room for good or going to bed.
  • For fuel burning space heaters, always use the proper type of fuel specified by the manufacturer.
  • Keep anything flammable at least three feet from heat sources including furnaces, fireplaces, wood stoves or portable space heaters.
  • Maintain a kid-free zone around open fires and space heaters.
  • Have chimneys cleaned and inspected yearly by a qualified or certified professional.
  • Make sure fireplaces have a sturdy screen to stop sparks from getting into the room or on the flooring. Always allow ashes to cool before putting them in a metal container. Keep the container a safe distance from your home or any out buildings.
  • Test all smoke alarms monthly.
  • Always hire a qualified professional when installing furnaces, water heaters, central heating and air equipment or gas appliances.

Winter Weather Means An Increase In House Fires

11/26/2019 (Permalink)

Every holiday season we unfortunately see an increase in the amount of fires in Maryville, TN. With the holiday season comes cold weather and often the need to add some extra heat. But when you add seasonal décor and extra heat sources, there are added risks involved.

According to FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Association and NFPA, the National Fire Prevention Association, half of all home fires caused by heating sources occur in the months of December, January, and February. Additionally, 1 in 6 home fires are a result of heating equipment, and 1 in 5 home fire deaths.

Extra precaution should be used to prevent fire damage and recognize the added risks.

  • Place all items including Christmas trees, candles, and other holiday decorations at least three feet away from heat sources like fireplaces, portable heaters, radiators, heat vents, and candles
  • Never use portable generators inside a residence or business. The output of carbon monoxide and fumes can be a silent killer.
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector and inspect it at least once a month.
  • Have a professional inspect your chimney annually to make sure it's operating correctly and cleaned as needed.
  • Never overload outlets with electrical heating sources. Make sure cord are not frayed or worn. No more than one source should be plugged in to one outlet.
  • Keep fire extinguishers serviced and up to date. Always keep one in the kitchen, close to the stove.
  • Always discard used and cooled ashes properly, a minimum of 10 feet away from houses or any building, using a metal container.

To learn more about SERVPRO of Blount County and our fire damage services click here. For more tips on preventing winter fires and education visit www.usfa.fema.gov/winter and www.nfpa.org/winter

Smoke Alarms: Saves Lives

3/15/2019 (Permalink)

Smoke Alarm

Smoke alarms save lives when properly installed and maintained, according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).

In homes, smoke alarms should be in every bedroom, outside each sleeping area, and on every level, including the basement. Extra smoke alarms may be needed in large homes.

Test smoke alarms monthly using the test button. Smoke alarms with non-replaceable batteries need the entire smoke alarm unit replaced every ten years. Other alarms need batteries replaced every year, and the group replaced every ten years. If the alarm chirps are signaling low battery, take the proper steps to replace the unit or the batteries immediately.

Never disable or remove the battery from an alarm. Almost half of the fires where smoke alarms were present but did not activate had missing or disconnected batteries (NFPA).

If you need help installing, testing or changing batteries in your smoke alarms, contact your local fire department, an electrician or the American Red Cross.

Be sure your home has a fire emergency plan in place and conduct regular fire drills with your family.

For more information on Emergency Preparedness, contact your local SERVPRO® Franchise Professional.

Heating Safety Tips

3/10/2019 (Permalink)

Keep anything flammable at least three feet away from heating equipment, like the furnace, fireplace, wood stove or a portable n space heater. Have a three foot “kid-free zone” around open fires and space heaters.

Make sure the fireplace has a sturdy n screen to stop sparks from flying into the room. Ashes should be cold before putting them in a metal container. Keep the container a safe distance away from your home.

Remember to turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed.

Test smoke alarms monthly.

Always use the right kind of fuel, specified by the manufacturer, for fuel burning space heaters.

Have heating equipment and chimneys cleaned and inspected every year by a qualified professional.

If your property does suffer fire damage, contact your local SERVPRO® of Blount County Professionals.

Using A Portable Fire Extinguisher

12/3/2018 (Permalink)

Fire Extinguisher

A portable fire extinguisher can be a life and property saving tool when used correctly. In order to operate an extinguisher, the National

Fire Prevention Association suggests remembering the word PASS:

-Pull the pin. Hold the nozzle pointing away from you and release
the locking mechanism.

-Aim low. Point the extinguisher at the base of the fire.

- Squeeze the lever slowly and evenly.

- Sweep the nozzle from side-to-side.

Read the instructions on the fire extinguisher and become familiar
with them before a fire breaks out. Remember, extinguishers do have
limitations. It is also important to ensure you have the correct type of extinguisher for your facility. For more information
on the different types of fire extinguishers and to ensure you have the proper one, visit nfpa.org.

Safety First Before You Eat

11/26/2018 (Permalink)


Each November, families gather to celebrate Thanksgiving by preparing a delicious feast, but if you don’t practice safe cooking habits, your happy holiday could become hazardous very quickly.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, cooking is the main cause for home fires and injuries, with Thanksgiving being the peak day for cooking-related fires.

Review the following safety tips to help ensure you can enjoy a safe holiday.

-Never leave cooking food unattended–stay in the kitchen when frying, grilling or broiling food. If someone must leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, they should turn off the stove.

-Check food regularly while cooking and remain in the home while cooking. Use a timer as a reminder that the stove or oven is on.

-Keep the kids away from the cooking area. Enforce a “kid-free zone” and make them stay at least three feet away from the stove.

- Keep anything flammable–pot holders, oven mitts, wooden utensils, paper or plastic bags, food packaging, and towels or curtains—away from the stove, oven or any other appliance in the kitchen that generates heat.

-Do not wear loose clothing or dangling sleeves while cooking.

-Clean cooking surfaces on a regular basis to prevent grease buildup.

- Purchase a fire extinguisher to keep in the kitchen. Contact the local fire department for training on the proper use of extinguishers.

-Always check the kitchen before going to bed or leaving the home to make sure all stoves, ovens, and small appliances are turned off.

-Install a smoke alarm near the kitchen, on each level of the home, near sleeping areas and inside and outside bedrooms. Use the test button to check it each month. Replace all batteries at least once a year.

SERVPRO® of Maryville and Alcoa f wishes you a safe and happy holiday season.

What To Do Until Help Arrives

10/7/2018 (Permalink)

House Fire

A fire can leave behind soot, smoke damage and a host of other problems.
Ceilings, walls, woodwork, carpeting, and floors will often need a thorough
professional cleaning. If your home or business suffers a fire, it is important to take the appropriate steps to prevent further damage until your local SERVPRO® of Maryville/Alcoa arrive. The following tips may help reduce damage and increase chances of a successful restoration.

DO:

  • Limit movement in the home to prevent soot particles from being embedded into upholstery and carpet.
  • Keep hands clean. Soot on hands can further soil upholstery, walls, and woodwork.
    Place dry, colorfast towels or old linens on rugs, upholstery, and carpet traffic areas.
  • If electricity is off, empty freezer/refrigerator completely and prop doors open to help prevent odor.
  • Wipe soot from chrome kitchen/bathroom faucets, trim and appliances, then protect these surfaces with a light coating of lubricant.
  • If heat is off during winter, pour RV antifreeze in sinks, toilet bowls, holding tanks and tubs to avoid freezing pipes and fixtures.
  • Tape double layers of cheesecloth over air registers to stop particles of soot from getting in or out of the HVAC system.DON'T:
  • Don’t attempt to wash any walls or painted surfaces without first contacting your SERVPRO® of Maryville/Alcoa

DON'T

  • Don’t attempt to shampoo carpet or upholstered furniture without first consulting your SERVPRO® of Cedar Bluff.
  • Do not attempt to clean any electrical appliances (TV sets, radios, etc.) that may have been close to fire, heat or water without first consulting an authorized repair service.
  • Do not consume any food or beverages that may have been stored close to fire, heat or water, as they may be contaminated.
  • If the ceiling is wet, do not turn on ceiling fans. Wiring may be wet or damaged and cause electrical shock, and air movement may create secondary damage.
  • Don’t send garments to the dry cleaner. Improper cleaning may set
    in smoke odor.

Be Prepared This Summer

6/25/2018 (Permalink)

Each year, families and friends across the country enjoy the summer months with barbecues, camping trips, or by cooling off in a pool or lake. To enjoy these occasions, it is important to keep safety top of the mind to ensure you have fun in the sun.

According to a recent study by U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, nearly 11,900 Americans were injured by fireworks in 2015., with the majority happening in the month surrounding the Fourth of July. Another 8,700 are injured by charcoal/wood-burning and propane grill fires. A grill should always be supervised when in use. Keep children and pets a safe distance from the grilling area to prevent accidental burns or tipping of the grill.

Grills also cause an average of 8,9000 home structure or outdoor fires. "These fires caused an annual average of 50 civilian injuries and $2 million in direct property damage," according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).

If you enjoy lounging by the pool or going for a boat ride to cool off from the summer sun, make sure you exercise caution, especially when children are present. Only swim in approved areas and supervise children at all times when near water.

The summer season should be time to make memories and enjoy the great outdoors. Don't become a statistic. Take precautions to prevent these events from putting a damper on your summer months!

Celebrate Summer Safety

6/25/2018 (Permalink)

Campfire

Summer is a time to enjoy the great outdoors, but it is also important to keep safety in mind. Consider the following tips, provided by the National Fire Protection Association, to keep you and your family safe all summer long.

-When using a charcoal grill, only use starter fluids designed for barbecue grills: do not add fluid after coals have been lit. When using a gas grill, ensure the hose connection is tight; check hoses for leaks. Applying soapy water to the hose will easily and safely reveal any leaks. When camping always use a flame-retardant tent and set up camp far away from the campfire.

-Always build campfire downwind from the tent area. Clear vegetation and dig a pit before building your fire. Extinguish the fire before going to sleep or leaving the campsite.

-Store liquid fire starter (not gasoline) away from your tent and campfire and only use dry kindling freshen a campfire.

The Importance of Cleaning Dryer Vents

5/14/2018 (Permalink)

Clean Your Dryer Vents

According to FEMA, failure to clean home dryers causes 34% of home dryer fires. Home dryer fires cause $35 million in property loss and can even cause injury or death. To reduce the risk of these fires happening in your home, SERVPRO® of Maryville and Alcoa can help clean dryer vents and ducts that may have lint buildup. Other tips for keeping your dryer vents clean from the National Fire Protection Agency include cleaning the lint filter before and after each load and making sure the outdoor vent flap will open and is not
restricted by snow, a bird’s nest, or other potential obstacles.
Our certified professionals can come out for a free estimate. For more information on cleaning dryer vents, contact
SERVPRO® of Maryville and Alcoa.

Smoke Alarms

9/22/2017 (Permalink)

SMOKE ALARMS

Smoke alarms play a vital role in saving lives, and when properly installed, can reduce the risk of fire injury by half.

The National Fire Protection Association recommends smoke alarms be installed in every bedroom, outside all sleeping quarters and on every level of the house. Business owners should consult the local Fire Marshall to ensure specific building fire codes and smoke detector requirements are met.

Smoke alarms work best when paired with a fire escape plan. A plan allows your family, employees or clients to escape quickly and safely in an emergency situation.

Review the following tips regarding smoke detector installation and maintenance. For more on emergency preparedness, contact your local SERVPRO Franchise Professionals.

  • Install smoke alarms on every level of the home, including the basement.

  • Smoke alarms should be installed away from the kitchen to prevent false alarms. Generally, they should be at least 10 feet from cooking appliance.

  • Test smoke alarms at least once a month using the test button.

  • Replace batteries in all smoke alarms at least once a year. If an alarm “chirps” the battery is low and should be replaced right away.

  • Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old.

Prevent Fire Damage in the Winter Months in Maryville, TN

9/22/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Maryville

Every winter we see an increase in the amount of residential house fires in Maryville, TN, resulting in fire damage. With the winter months come cold weather, and the need to add some extra heat. But along with the extra heat, there are added risks involved.

According to FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Association and NFPA, the National Fire Prevention Association, half of all home fires caused by heating sources occur in the months of December, January, and February. Additionally, 1 in 6 home fires are a result of heating equipment, and 1 in 5 home fire deaths.

Extra precaution should be used to prevent fire damage and recognize the added risks.

  • Keep anything that can ignite and burn at least 3 feet from all heating sources. This includes gas fireplaces, wood burning fireplaces, space heaters, wood stoves, and radiators.
  • Never use portable generators inside a residence. The output of carbon monoxide and fumes can be a silent killer.
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector and inspect it at least once a month.
  • Have a professional inspect your chimney annually to make sure it's operating correctly, and cleaned as needed.
  • Never overload outlets with electrical heating sources. No more than one source should be plugged in to one outlet.
  • Keep fire extinguishers serviced and up to date.
  • If your pipes freeze and burst, be aware of electrical hazards with flooding water.
  • Always discard used and cooled ashes properly, a minimum of 10 feet away from houses or any building, using a metal container.

To learn more about SERVPRO of Maryville/Alcoa and fire damage services, visit here. For more tips on preventing winter fires and education, visit www.usfa.fema.gov/winter and www.nfpa.org/winter

Avoiding Holiday Disasters

8/8/2017 (Permalink)

Christmas Tree on Fire

It's the holiday season again. Brightly lit decorations, elaborate meals, and large gatherings are all a part of holiday celebrations. Unfortunately, these annual traditions also cause an average of 230 homes fires each year, with an average of 4 deaths, 21 injuries, and $17.3 million in property damage.

There are about 3 times as many cooking related fires on Thanksgiving Day and almost twice as many on Christmas Day as there on no holidays.  Luckily, homeowners can help keep their homes and their families safe during the holiday season by understanding the dangers.

Holiday Cooking Fire Facts from SERVPRO

  • Thanksgiving Day has three times the average number of reported home structure fires involving cooking equipment. 
  • The two other peak days for cooking-related fires are Christmas Day and Christmas Eve.

Holiday Cooking Safety Tips from SERVPRO

  • Supervise items on the stovetop. Fifty-eight percent of kitchen fires involve ranges; homes with electric cooktops have a higher risk of fire than homes with gas cooktops.
  • Keep flammable items – potholders, packaging, wrapping, wooden utensils, loose clothing – away from the stovetop.
  • Don’t let the lack of sleep or alcohol consumption affect your ability to concentrate on preparing the meal.

Holiday Decorating Fire Facts from SERVPRO

  • Half of all holiday decoration fires start because the decoration is too close to a heat source.
  • On average, 32 candle fires are reported each day. December is the peak month for candle fires.

Holiday Decorating Safety Tips from SERVPRO

  • Keep all decorations away from heat sources like radiators, portable heaters, and fireplaces.
  • Use flameless candles.
  • If you do use traditional candles, burn them in sturdy candleholders, well away from drapes and other flammable materials. Never leave them unattended and never allow them to burn down to less than one inch in length. 

Christmas Tree Fire Facts from SERVPRO

  • 50% of live tree fires occur between December 22 and January 5.
  • 31% of tree fires are caused by electrical problems.
  • 14% involve decorative lights.

Christmas Tree Safety Tips from SERVPRO

  • Keep live trees well watered to reduce the chance of a fire.
  • Check wiring on lights for breaks and wear, replace worn strings and don’t exceed manufacturer guidelines for connecting multiple strands of lights.
  • Don't leave tree lights plugged in when you are away from home or asleep.

Avoid Holiday Hazards

6/22/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage In A Oak Ridge Home

Avoid Holiday Hazards

Candles, pretty lights and decorations are just a few of the items that add to the charm and cheer of the holiday season however, if they are not used carefully your holidays may go from festive to frightening very quickly.

Review the following simple safety tips, provided by the National Fire Protection Association to greatly reduce the fire risk in your home or business this holiday season.

  • Two out of five home decoration fires are started by candles. Keep candles at least 12 inches away from anything that is flammable

  • Use sturdy candleholders that are not likely to tip over and place candles on clear, uncluttered surfaces. Consider using flameless candles instead of real candles.

  • Make sure your tree and decorations are at least three feet away from heat sources like fireplaces, radiators, space heaters candles or heat vents.

  • Make sure you have the correct type of lights for your  home. Some lights are designed for only indoor or outdoor use, but not both.

  • Carefully inspect light strands before hanging them. Replace any string of lights with worn or broken cords or loose bulb connections. Connect no more than three strands of light sets.

  • Remember to turn off outside decorative lights and Christmas tree lights before leaving or going to bed.

  • Get rid of your tree after Christmas or when it is dry. Dried-out trees are a fire danger and should not be left in the home or garage, or placed outside against the home. Check with your local community to find a recycling program.

  • Bring outdoor electrical lights inside after the holidays to prevent hazards and make them last longer.

Eliminate Heating Hazards This Winter

6/22/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage in Alcoa, TN

Eliminate Heating Hazards This Winter

The winter season is in full swing! The days are shorter and the temperatures are lower. No matter where you live, winter brings a change in the weather. In an effort to keep our homes and workplaces cozy, many people use alternative heat sources like fireplaces, portable space heaters, and wood burning stoves. According to the Nation Fire Protection Association, heating equipment is responsible for an estimated $893 million in property damage annually. Heating is the second leading cause of residential fire damage, making it important to review ways to help reduce the risk of a heating-related fire.

  • Keep anything flammable at least three feet from heating equipment, like the furnace, fireplace, wood stove, or a portable space heater. Have a three-foot “kid-free zone” around open fires and space heaters.

  • Remember to turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed.

  • Always use the right kind of fuel, specified by the manufacturer, for fuel burning space heaters.

  • Make sure the fireplace has a sturdy screen to stop sparks from flying into the room. Ashes should be cool before putting them in a metal container. Keep the container a safe distance away from your home.

  • Have heating equipment and chimneys cleaned and inspected every year by a qualified professional.

  • Have a qualified professional install stationary space heating equipment, water heaters or central heating equipment according to the local codes and manufacturer’s instructions.

  • Test smoke alarms monthly.